Women’s Army Corps (WAC) Flag

These Women’s Army Corps Flags (WAC) were out-of-print and unavailable until Flags Galore & More obtained permission from the Women’s Army Corp Museum in Washington DC to re-print these.Women's Army Corps

The 12″x18″ WAC flag is mounted on a 30″ black staff with spear top.

Wac Flag, Wac Flag Salute

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Description

Women's Army CorpsThe Women’s Army Corps (WAC) was the women’s branch of the United States Army.

It was created as an auxiliary unit, the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) on 15 May 1942 by Public Law 554, and converted to full status as the WAC on 1 July 1943.

Pallas Athene is the official insignia of the U.S. Women’s Army Corps

The WAAC’s organization was designed by numerous Army bureaus coordinated by Lt. Col. Gillman C. Mudgett, the first WAAC Pre-Planner; however, nearly all of his plans were discarded or greatly modified before going into operation because he expected a corps of only 11,000 women.

Without the support of the War Department, Representative Edith Nourse Rogers of Massachusetts introduced a bill on 28 May 1941, providing for a women’s army auxiliary corps. The bill was held up for months by the Bureau of the Budget but was resurrected after the United States entered the war and became law on 15 May 1942. A section authorizing the enlistment of 150,000 volunteers was temporarily limited by executive order to 25,000.

The WAAC was modeled after comparable British units, especially the ATS, which caught the attention of Chief of Staff George C. Marshall. In 1942, the first contingent of 800 members of the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps began basic training at Fort Des Moines Provisional Army Officer Training School, Iowa. The women were fitted for uniforms, interviewed, assigned to companies and barracks and inoculated against disease during the first day.

Its first director was Oveta Culp Hobby, a prominent woman in Texas society. The WAC was disbanded in 1978, and all units were integrated with male units.

About 150,000 American women eventually served in the WAAC and WAC during World War II. They were the first women other than nurses to serve with the Army.

This WAC Flag works well with a No Tangle Flagpole.

 

 

 

 

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